Speech Therapy

Sky Bridge Therapies specializes in pediatric speech-language therapy providing both 1-on-1 and small group therapy to treat children with a variety of speech-language concerns and communication disorders. Through individualized treatment plans and a play-based therapy approach, our speech-language therapists work to help children improve their speech and language skills.

Speech-Language Therapy addresses these primary areas and many more:

Expressive Language
Expressive Language
Expressive language is a broad term that describes how a person communicates their wants and needs. Expressive language skills include: facial expressions, gestures, intentionality, vocabulary, semantics (word/sentence meaning), morphology, and syntax (grammar rules).
Receptive Language
Receptive Language
Receptive language refers to an individual’s ability to understand information. It involves understanding the words, sentences and meaning of what others say or what is read.
Articulation
Articulation
Articulation refers to the production of speech sounds. Children may have errors in speech for one specific sound, or a group of sound classes. For example, a child may say "tat" for "cat". When multiple speech sounds show a pattern, errors are classified as phonological disorders.
Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Childhood Apraxia of Speech
Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) is a motor speech disorder that impacts a child's speech clarity. Children with CAS have difficulty planning and producing refined movements of the jaw, lips, and tongue needed for clear speech. CAS is characterized by inconsistent sound production and discoordination of movement.
Pragmatics & Social Skills
Pragmatics & Social Skills
Social skills are the key to developing and maintaining meaningful interpersonal relationships. Social skills involve facilitating awareness and change in interactions based on general social rules and norms (i.e. exchanging greetings, turn-taking, cooperative play).
Auditory Processing
Auditory Processing
Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) is a neurological disorder that affects how the brain processes spoken language. APD makes it difficult for an individual to process verbal instructions and filter out background noise.
Pre-Literacy & Reading Skills
Pre-Literacy & Reading Skills
Pre-Literacy and reading skills include oral language, alphabet knowledge, print knowledge, phonological awareness (rhyming, sound play), and emergent writing.
Voice
Voice
Voice Disorders are considered to be an abnormality of one or more of the three characteristics of voice: pitch (intonation), intensity (loudness), and quality (resonance). Voice disorders may be caused by vocal abuse (repeated yelling/whispering), vocal cord dysfunction, infection, inflammation, neuromuscular disorder, or psychological conditions.
Fluency/Stuttering
Fluency/Stuttering
Stuttering is a speech disorder that impacts fluidity of speech. Fluency disorders are characterized by sound or word repetitions, pauses, or drawn out syllables, words, and phrases. In more severe cases, groping or nonverbal symptoms (e.g. ticks, silent blocks) are also present.
Oral-Motor Skills & Feeding
Oral-Motor Skills & Feeding
There are many different types of feeding difficulties. They can take on one or more of the following forms:
Trouble accepting/swallowing food textures
Throwing tantrums at mealtimes
Refusing to eat certain food groups
Refusing to eat any solids or liquids
Choking, gagging or vomiting when eating
Oral motor and sensory problems
Gastrostomy or naso-gastric dependence
Augmentative & Alternative Communication
Augmentative & Alternative Communication
Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is an umbrella term that encompasses the communication methods used to supplement or replace speech or writing for those with impairments in the production or comprehension of spoken or written language.